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File: 1473796691366.jpg (91.11 KB, 640x757, 1473171281505.jpg)

 No.1259[View All]

2chan japan rail thread, just for fun:

go http://dat.2chan.net/r/futaba.htm
bring something back, bonus points for translating.
136 posts and 96 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.5591

File: 1524280493514.jpg (195.62 KB, 1200x900, DbJXkfWU0AIyeI4.jpg)


 No.5594

>>5591
Someone heard they like rail vehicles, I guess.

 No.5598

>>5591 – Now that is hitting the shutter release at the right moment.

 No.5599

>>5594
No the locomotive is on the farthest track but looking at it quickly it does look like it's resting on that… thing

 No.5600

>>5599
>That joke
———–
>You

 No.5601

>>5599 – Well, the ‘thing’ is a departmental MoW vehicle, that much is obvious. In fact, I think it is a KiYa 97 rail transporter.

jp.wikipedia on the KiYa 97: https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/JR%E6%9D%B1%E6%B5%B7%E3%82%AD%E3%83%A497%E7%B3%BB%E6%B0%97%E5%8B%95%E8%BB%8A

>>5600 – Boot-to-da-head!

 No.5602

File: 1524869760713.jpg (272.32 KB, 992x1600, 1522589121925.jpg)

( ´∀`)< Honk honk!

 No.5603

File: 1524870129580.jpg (101.42 KB, 1050x754, 1523748109879.jpg)

Pretty tight curve radius, I'd say. The 4.1 x 3 m loading gauge uses the track gauge pretty well, I think. What sort of wehicle widths they have, I think.

 No.5604

File: 1524870203966.jpg (202.29 KB, 640x427, 1524580421969.jpg)

?
That was a question.

Kind of interurbanish service, it looks like.

It feels horrible looking the above posts done stoned (more than now), what does it do to one's grammar.

 No.5605

>>5604 – The Enshū Railway in Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture is retiring their last 30-series EMU at the end of the month, and making a big do out of it.

 No.5633

File: 1525212828395.jpg (455.76 KB, 1280x960, 1525119895907.jpg)

Gods above and below… I am not even far from drunk enough for this…

 No.5637

File: 1525258709044.jpg (452.11 KB, 1280x1024, 1525096571648.jpg)

Minitoblerone.

>>5633
"Stand up, damned of the Earth
Stand up, prisoners of starvation"?

 No.5638

File: 1525259505124.jpg (299.67 KB, 844x608, 1525078435210.jpg)

Whoops.

(Anyway, I checked the rough lenght myself, 21.4 m for some passenger coaches, whilst here it is about 26 m. Seems reasonable but still people say on that another transit chan that JR is stuggling with freight.)

 No.5639

>>5638
IIRC rail freight has very little relevance in Japan, for various reasons: there's dense passenger service, small-ish loading gauge, and population density makes rail freight less economical than trucks (not so many large shipments that have to go long ways, etc.)
This is from hearsay tho, maybe someone with more specific knowledge can tell you more.

 No.5640

File: 1525276457392.jpg (1.29 MB, 2592x1944, Model_M250_of_JR_Freight.jpg)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan_Freight_Railway_Company

The situation is quite the reverse from the US. In Japan, freight runs on passenger lines. And, yes, JR Freight is kind of the ’poor stepsibling’ in the JR Group, with about 50km/30mi of rail in its name. OTOH, they do have one of the coolest freight movers about, namely the M250 “Super Rail Cargo” EMU.

 No.5695

File: 1526236012417.jpg (89.62 KB, 700x525, 1526144552119.jpg)

Oh… OH! Of course! It is not a draisine, it is a kei bus!

 No.5733

>>5639
Some of the most intensive JR freight routes operate through the Seikan Tunnel (and they might get gimped to make way for the moneypit Shinkansen).

Coastal shipping is still common in Japan (it's not a coincidence that so many Japanese factories are located on or near the coast). If you fly into Haneda you'll see that Tokyo Bay is full of barges and little cargo ships.

 No.5822

File: 1528880709803.jpg (118.26 KB, 1280x736, 6000.jpg)

>>5587
That is one of four cab modifications done to the 6000 series in Jakarta
all of them retired in 2016

 No.5846

File: 1529424188774.jpg (347.43 KB, 1600x989, 1529309888765.jpg)

Ulch! The Shikoku 8600s look loopy enough *without* photoshopping them like that!

 No.5867

File: 1529876104609.jpg (121.45 KB, 500x375, 1529519932730.jpg)

← These are pocket-sized destination blinds one can buy as souvenirs.

Someone’s been stealing the real thing from several JR Hokkaido trains (as if JRH isn’t in enough straits already!) and covering the thefts up with blinds painted on paper.

https://www.jrhokkaido.co.jp/CM/Info/press/pdf/20180621_KO_StolenInfomationFilm.pdf

IIUGTC (If I Understood Google Translate Correctly), the thefts were discovered when employees noted that some blinds did not rotate as they should.

 No.5883

File: 1530034247946.jpg (58.05 KB, 600x314, 1529925979979.jpg)

Yes, the Shingelion is no more…

HelLOO, Kitty!

 No.5884

File: 1530036398117.jpg (166.06 KB, 960x1280, 1530026369569.jpg)

Oh, yes. Maid trains are, or at least were, a thing. Seibu was perhaps the first railco to run them, using their 10000-series "New Red Arrow" express trains.

 No.5886

File: 1530053713050.jpg (120.95 KB, 550x374, hamanasu-3.jpg)

>>5884 – There is a Japanese website, maidtrain.info (probably a dead site), that states on its About page that the first railco to run maid trains was Kashima Rinkai – of Girls&Panzer fame – using their KRT-7000 express DMU, the Marine Liner Hamanasu.

 No.5887

>>5886
>>5884
This gives my boner a boner.

 No.5888

>>5887 – It gets weirder still. It seems that Kashima Rinkai worked with another small railco, Hitachinaka Seaside, to hire cosplay maids from Tokyo Akihabara, and both companies ran maid trains.

And the big blink-blinker? I do not know if it did happen, but there were plans to run butler trains as well, with staff from the Swallowtail Butler Café.

 No.5898

File: 1530417106539.jpg (194.01 KB, 1280x691, 1530074963538.jpg)

pretty pink 😻

 No.5918

File: 1531260540999.jpg (92.21 KB, 950x750, 1531182462022.jpg)

Odakyu’s venerable Romance Car LSE had its last run today.

 No.5973

File: 1532620887203.jpg (1.08 MB, 1958x1469, 1532529565014.jpg)

Chill.

 No.5976

Aside: The pic in >>5973 shows Mori-Miyanohara station on the Iiyama line. It is among the snowiest railway stations in the world, and has a 7.85m (25′9″) tall station marker that also marks the deepest snowfall recorded (in 1945-02-12) at the station.

See https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Morimiyanohara_Station_2018-06_2.jpg for a better view.

 No.5984

File: 1533118670930.jpg (465.66 KB, 1920x1080, 1532963713293.jpg)

JR Hokkaido intends to buy these H100s to replace their old KiHa40 rustbuckets. For a change, they are diesel-electric instead of diesel-hydraulic.

 No.5985

>>5898
Me-Wow!

 No.6020

File: 1533761681855.jpg (54.74 KB, 450x522, 1533706971553.jpg)

Man, one finds the oddest of things sucking from wires nowadays…

 No.6029

File: 1533935785394.jpg (45.37 KB, 398x500, 1533732695721.jpg)

(pic found in a modelling thread)

On 2005-12-25, Inaho #14, 485-3000 trainset R24, derailed between Sagoshi and Kita-Amarume stations on the Uetsu main line after a very strong crosswind gust struck the train just after it crossed the Mogami river.

Five passengers were killed, and 33 pax and crew wounded, some seriously.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uetsu_Main_Line

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/JR%E7%BE%BD%E8%B6%8A%E6%9C%AC%E7%B7%9A%E8%84%B1%E7%B7%9A%E4%BA%8B%E6%95%85

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=https%3A%2F%2Fja.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FJR%E7%BE%BD%E8%B6%8A%E6%9C%AC%E7%B7%9A%E8%84%B1%E7%B7%9A%E4%BA%8B%E6%95%85&hl=en&ie=UTF8&sl=ja&tl=en

 No.6034

>>6020
How do you load/empty the dump bed, then? You'd need an auxiliary battery to get out from underneath the wires.
Assuming it's not just a 'shoop.

 No.6036

>>6034 – Nope, looks to be completely real. Hitachi advertises a mine truck that uses trolley assist to climb out of the mine.

See also:
http://hutnyak.com/Pages/HutnyakConsulting.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhqgVimGZRs – Trolley assist.
https://miningforzambia.com/big-clean-green-machines/ – One mine claims to save eight million litres of diesel per year with trolley assist on the climb-out.

 No.6038

File: 1534134055886.jpg (417.24 KB, 1200x800, 205667.jpg)

>>6020 >>6034
I know Soviets also experimented with trolley-dumptrucks for quarries. Not sure anything of that was used commercially BUT…

They did also invent an entirely new type of rail vehicle called the traction unit comprised of electric locomotive section, 1-3 motor-dumpcars and, often, a diesel-generator unit. So this is functionally a railway analog of this electric dump truck, but with also regular dumpcars attached to it. Meanwhile, the motorized dumpcars, when loaded, provide an extra adhesive weight (thus they can carry useful load too AND provide extra traction only when it's needed with the full train climbing back to the surface level).
Very clever and efficient design if you ask me. They are widely used in ex-USSR and I believe also in China.

The first unit on the photo is the electric locomotive unit, the second one is diesel-generator unit (also locomotive unit) and the yellow dumpcar is the motorized dumpcar.

These things have 30 tons of axle load, which, along wityh their unique design, makes them suitable for hauling trains on grades up to 6% (60‰)!

 No.6039

File: 1534135395822.jpg (345.37 KB, 1024x679, 20101205_293091.jpg)

>>6034
Back to your question, more modern traction units switch to side-located "fishing rod" current collectors as they approach loading area, so the wire is located on the side thus not interfering with loading.

On the photo you see one using the side wire. It is modern NP1 7800 kW traction unit produced by NEVZ in Russia and it does not have a DGU. Ones with diesel-generators often use them, also diesels on them are usually used to move cars between the mining facility and a mainline railway station which usually has different power system.
So, where am I leading it, since the truck on the photo does not have "fishing rods" it must be having an auxiliary diesel-generator too. Really, many parallels with the traction units, I like that. TUs are really cool.

 No.6041

>>6038
>>6039
This is one of those instances where you come up with an idea, think it's clever, and only then find out someone else came up with the same thing decades ago.
Engineer a way to economically retrofit standard freight car bogies with tiny little traction motors, just enough to move itself; turn every car in the consist into an EMU run off head-end power. You'd only really use them for starting off, steep grades, and dynamic braking, so maintenance shouldn't be that bad.

 No.6042

I have had such flights of fancy myself, like BEMU (Battery EMU) or DMU freight cars that would give power for starting, shunting/switching or climbing and (for the BEMUs) recover it when braking and (to lesser degree) running level, possible accepting head end or shore power for topping up.

 No.6043

File: 1534263632243.jpg (1.01 MB, 1536x2048, 1533976888060.jpg)

>second page be like

>>6041
I thought I was original with the idea of self propelled/assist freight too, but then I found patents about it lol. Take it a step further and tape on some ultracaps so some braking energy can be recovered for the next acceleration. It would also allow for high redundancy so if even all of them fail, the loco and regular brakes could keep the train going.
It could also revolutionise shunting with multiple self assembling trains working at a time. If a consultation job arrives at a reasonable unit cost, it would simply be a matter of selling the practical implementation.

 No.6046

File: 1534298309682.jpg (561.44 KB, 1300x731, 20151228_544548.jpg)

>>6041
>>6042
This isn't actually economical at all. There is a solid reason why most freight cars are as mechanically simple and low-maintenance as possible. Imagine this, should they have even simplest traction drive, there will be at least a couple of traction motors and gearboxes, battery, traction converter, some auxiliary schematics, digital controller - all that would amount for the price of the entire car without it all, trust me. But this isn't even the main problem, even smaller freight operators have THOUSANDS of cars in their stock, and all of this should be maintained, and since we are having traction electrics here, with much more qualified personnel, among other things, like parts etc.

It will be an economical nightmare. Typical electric rolling stock has a lifetime maintenance cost comparable to its original cost. And mind you the original cost will be, like, twice as high too.

>>6043 And this will not serve for better redundancy too, in fact this will be a giant chain of points of failure, since at least motors and gearboxes if failed will likely endanger the safety of the entire train because you DO NOT want to have a broken gear or a bearing in a moving train, and with dozens, if not hundreds, of axle-motor assemblies in your train the failure probability will skyrocket, even if you, through great expenses, will manage to maintain it all properly.

Heck, which traction drives are we talking about if even just an electropneumatic brakes is an unaffordable luxury for most freight trains, despite it literally requires just a single wire and a special air distributor? Compared to the proposed it is as simple as a banana.

 No.6047

File: 1534298741259.jpg (374.29 KB, 1200x800, 20140627_475990.jpg)

>>6046

>>6041 And traction units use this principle substantially differently mind you. The motor-dumpcars here are part of the traction unit itself, most of the cargo is transported still with normal cars, motor-cars are essentially just boosters instead of useless ballast using (and transporting) actual cargo. And thus they are maintained as, most of the time, inseparable part of the traction unit.

Sorry to ruin it for you guys, but this idea essentially disrupts the whole concept of a modern freight train. Likely far into the future we (or our kids) will see vast maglev networks with relatively short but blazing fast drone trains carrying containerized cargo with their cars sorting themselves autonomously. But first some VERY significant technical advancements shall be made to make this all economically valid. Sure, technically this is more or less possible today but not very practical yet.

 No.6048

Hence why I described my thoughts as flights of fancy. They are dreamworks, after all.

OTOH, there are already a few dedicated freight EMUs, mainly the CarGoTram in Dresden and the M250 “Super Rail Cargo” running between Tokyo and Osaka.

 No.6050

File: 1534514319716.jpg (212.85 KB, 800x479, 1534162546837.jpg)


 No.6051

>>6050 – Keio… I am reminded of a British Rail ad for the Intercity 125, in which this question was asked: “Who’s ever heard of a train jam?”

Keio, Keikyu and Tokyu would no doubt respond with a big, resounding “US!!!!!”

 No.6133

File: 1536244881788.jpg (202.45 KB, 1200x675, 1536163352187.jpg)

“The Kansai Airport Line is currently closed due to damaged track and wet ballast. We apologise for the inconvenience.”

 No.6148

File: 1536367223869.jpg (189.13 KB, 800x502, 9.jpg)

>>6133
yeah uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
this doesn't help either

 No.6171

File: 1536426523754.jpg (566.27 KB, 1839x1379, 1536123420951.jpg)

Hence, track damage. The rail deck got misaligned, too.

 No.6172


 No.6193

>>6172 – Typhoon Jebi did that; threw that little tanker at the bridge that connects the Kansai International Airport to shore. Right now, there is only the downwind half of the road and a ferry that connect the airport to Osaka.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoon_Jebi_(2018)



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